Skip to Content

Education

GR8 Po$$ibiliT's

Team members of GR8 Po$$ibiliT’s have created the Midlands Diversity Academy, which is designed to bring together students representing diverse backgrounds, experiences, cultures, faiths, and perspectives to discuss their future, the barriers that obstruct their future, and the overall impact on the state of South Carolina if they do not graduate.  Through student engagement and interaction, participants will discuss the challenges that high school students face on a daily basis which represent potential barriers to graduation and the pursuit of post–secondary education.

Hear Me, See Me

Hear Me, See Me engaged with the South Carolina School for the Deaf and Blind to explore opportunities to increase diversity within its residential Spartanburg campus.

We considered many projects proposed by administration that included racial composition of students, programs for students with cochlear implants, early childhood programs, and admissions policy of visually impaired children. Hear Me, See Me started down the path of revising the admission policy for visually impaired students with the intent of widening admission criteria to bring in low vision students that were otherwise ineligible for admission. During our due diligence we uncovered the School’s blind spot – the current educational model was antiquated and not optimal for the mission of the School and its desire to use its resources to help each child be as successful as she or he can be.

Horry: RISE (Respect, Integrity, Service, Excellence)

The Conway attendance area, which rests in the heart of the Horry County School District, is made up of 5 elementary schools, 2 middle schools, and one high school. One of 9 attendance areas in the county, Conway is probably the most diverse one. It compasses the Conway city limits, rural farmland of the county, and has communities that thrive along the Waccamaw river. Conway is one of the oldest cities in Horry County and its inhabitants exhibit pride in the community and in the school system. It is an ideal place to settle down and raise a family.

IMPACT (Influencing My Peers as a Caring Team)

Project IMPACT was designed to raise poverty awareness high school student leaders in the Greenville community.  A specialized program provided a venue for 9-12th grade students to identify diversity blind spots and influence change in their school communities.  The inaugural program, held December 9, 2016, included over 50 student council class representatives from Greenville and Mauldin High Schools. Student leaders participated in a live-action poverty simulation designed to highlight everyday challenges some peers may face.

Inclusion Infusion

The Inclusion Infusion team of the Riley Institute’s Upstate Diversity Leaders Initiative recognized a need to honor “organizations, programs, and individuals for their contributions in promoting international diversity in the Upstate.” To accomplish this mission, the Infusion Inclusion team organized the International Diversity Leadership Recognition Dinner, which was a “regional evening dinner event to recognize and celebrate good deeds and community service by Upstate individuals and organizations who are leaders in the field of promoting international diversity.”

Investing in Islanders

For a number of years enrollment at St. John’s High School on John’s Island has been declining. Students are being lured away by magnet and charter schools and other opportunities, leaving the school at a disadvantage with lower student numbers and funding. In an effort to create opportunities for the current student body and to better compete for potential student enrollment, St. John’s High School embarked on a strategic planning process. To that end, a strategic plan was established with several goals. One goal is to create internship opportunities for St.

iUpstate

Upstate South Carolina boasts the highest international investment per capita than any other region in the United States. With such high numbers of “ex-pats” (ex-patriots) moving into the area each year, iUpstate identified the need for a comprehensive, user-fed website that provides answers to some of the most common questions asked by these internationals, regardless of country of origin. The website is located at www.iUpstate.org

Keepers of the Promise

Keepers of the Promise partnered with Charleston Promise Neighborhood in support of their mission to “provide every child in our Neighborhood with a clear path to college” by broadening their foundational work on the College Quotient – CQ PrepBook. Keepers of the Promise aided in definition of market assessment and viability for the CQ PrepBook which provides weekly activities for Grades 1-5.

Key Konnectors

Background/Situation Analysis

On the Road Again is a project of the South Carolina Foster Parent Association which provides donated cars to foster care youth who are at least 18 and not yet 21 years old, actively employed, pursuing a GED or engaged in a post-high school educational program. With adequate transportation, these young people are able pursue their goals of continuing education and employment, allowing for a more successful transition into adulthood.

Killer Bees

The Killer Bees presented a case study on the effects of racial and ethnic diversity as a result of admission criteria used by Buist Academy, a K-8 school located in the Lowcountry. Created in the mid-1980s, as a way to increase diversity in public schools, Buist came under extreme scrutiny by the residents of its District 20 because non-minority students were not granted admission to the academy. The Killer Bees studied Buist Academy's history and relevant legislation in order to investigate admissions procedures at magnet schools.