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Health

The Good News Bears

The Good News Bears (GNB) of the Upstate DLI sought to find an interested community partner to assist adults who may be underemployed or unemployed. GNB plans to design practical, relevant sessions to support adults interested in preparing for job interviews, connecting with community resources, and receiving educational support on a variety of topics.

The Mobilizers

The “Mobilizers” capstone project seeks to provide every child in Greenville, regardless of race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status access to safe, quality play and recreation. Children of ethnic and racial minorities and lower socioeconomic status are more vulnerable than other populations to obesity and related health conditions such as diabetes so improving access of these groups to activities which promote a healthy lifestyle is key.

The Renovators

Outdoor play is crucial for physical and social development for all young children, but especially for children at risk. The Renovators adopted the playground at Park Hills Early Learning Center in Spartanburg School District 7, a school recently established to serve the most at-risk zero to four year olds in the school district. After researching best practices, we raised $4,800 through corporate sponsorship to provide age-appropriate playground equipment that promotes social, cognitive and physical development of young children.

The Talented Tenth

Recognizing an under-representation of minorities in South Carolina’s health care field, The Talented Tenth established an advisory council of experts to advise and assist in the establishment of diversity and inclusion agendas for the emerging USC School of Medicine-Greenville.

Trailblazers

The Mary Black Rail Trail is a multi- use trail that runs through Spartanburg County. The group plans to utilize the Mary Black Rail Trail in order to build community and celebrate diversity. The goal is to celebrate some of the positive things that are already happening in Spartanburg – successes, history and where the community is going. Thirty percent of people who use the Rail Trail are minorities. The focus will be on this area because the trail brings people of different backgrounds together.

Wake Up Carolina

The purpose of Team Wake Up Carolina’s project is to inform the state of South Carolina about the prevalence of opioid addiction. Through the spread of personal testimonies of the effects of drug abuse, Wake Up Carolina will communicate its life-saving message about the signs of opioid addiction at schools, churches, police departments, and other locations. The project’s goals are to break stereotypes about drug addiction and to “turn the light on” when it comes to awareness of opioid addiction for communities around the state.

Walking with the Doc

The GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail is a 21-mile multi-use trail that extends from Greenville to Travelers Rest. The beauty of the trail is that it affords all residents – no matter their age, race, or athletic ability – the opportunity to get fit and be active. However, research shows that less than 10% of Swamp Rabbit Trail users are non-white. This is especially troubling given that physical inactivity is a leading cause of chronic diseases like heart disease, which minorities are already at greater risk of developing.

weeROAR

Many pediatric providers in Beaufort County participate in the Reach Out and Read (ROR) program, a national, non-profit school readiness organization. Physicians, who take care of children, partner with ROR to give books to those aged 6 months to 5 years during their well child checks and to encourage parents to read aloud to them daily. Research by the ROR program has shown that children from families that participate have larger vocabularies, stronger language skills and a six month edge when they enter kindergarten.

WICnic

The WICnic Group seeks to improve health and life success prospects for economically disadvantaged children in South Carolina by providing families with greater access to nutrition counseling and healthy food options. We opted to leverage an existing USDA program – Women, Infants & Children (WIC) – that is administered in South Carolina by the SC Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) (www.scdhec.gov/wic). Research has shown that WIC plays an important role in improving birth outcomes, containing health care costs and improving children’s diets, among a long list of benefits. But barriers, such as transportation, prevent many who need the service from receiving it.